Studies show that educational achievement gaps already exist at Kindergarten entry.  Children from low-income families are more likely to start school with limited language skills, health problems and social and emotional problems that interfere with learning.  The larger the gap at school entry, the harder it is to close.

Language proficiency is a key predictor of school success. Early literacy skills (size of vocabulary, recognizing letters, understanding letter and sound relationships) at kindergarten entry are good predictors of children's reading abilities throughout their educational careers. Language and literacy skills enable children to develop cognitive skills and knowledge and to interact effectively with peers and adults.

 








"Closing the Gap: Done in a Decade" in Thinking K-16, Vol. 5, Issue 2 (Spring 2001). Washington, DC: Kati Haycock et. al., The Education Trust.

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The Condition of Education 2002 (June 2002). Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, Office of Educational Research and Improvement, National Center for Education Statistics.

  • Indicator 7: Reading Performance of Students in Grade 4
  • Indicator 8: Trends in the Achievement Gap in Reading Between White & Black Students
  • Indicator 11: Poverty and Student Achievement
  • Indicator 26: First-Time Kindergartner's Approaches to Learning

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"Development in the First Years of Life" in The Future of Children, Vol. 11, No.1-Caring for Infants and Toddlers. (Spring/Summer 2001). Ross A. Thompson. Los Altos, CA: The David and Lucile Packard Foundation.

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Early Childhood and Family Education: New Realities, New Opportunities (1999). Washington, DC: Council of Chief State School Officers.

Click here for information on how to order this publication.

 

Early Childhood Education: From Efficacy Research to Improved Practice (2002). Washington, DC: Craig Ramey, U.S. Department of Education.

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From Neurons to Neighborhoods: The Science of Early Childhood Development (2000). Washington, DC: Jack P. Shonkoff and Deborah A. Phillips eds., National Academy Press.

Click here for more information on this publication.

 

Good Start, Grow Smart: The Bush Administration's Early Childhood Initiative (2002).

Click here for more information on Good Start, Grow Smart.

 

The Head Start Path to Positive Child Outcomes (July 2001). Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, Administration for Children and Families.

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No Child Left Behind Policy Brief: State Information Systems (2002). Ravay Snow-Renner and Marga Torrence, Denver, CO: Education Commission of the States.

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Supporting Cognitive Development in Early Childhood (2002). Speech given during the White House Summit on Early Childhood Cognitive Development, August 30, 2002. Washington, DC: Susan H. Landry, U.S. Department of Education.

Click here to download this publication.

 

Summary Comments (2002). Speech given during the White House Summit on Early Childhood Cognitive Development, August 30, 2002. Washington, DC: Reid Lyon, U.S. Department of Education.

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The School Readiness Indicators Initiative is supported by the David and Lucile Packard Foundation, the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation and the Ford Foundation.
The 17-state initiative is managed by Rhode Island KIDS COUNT